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Disrupting and celebrating: An evening of art, performance, poetry, and music

Tuesday May 30  //  Doors 7:00 pm, Show 8:15 pm  //  Free Public Event

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Join us for a night of transformative cabaret to honour the power of art to evoke, inspire and engage!  This evening which brings together artists, poets, and performers is part of the activities of the local organizing committee of the Conference of the Canadian Association for Social Work Education as part of the 2017 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. This is a community event open to all

Performers

Christine King Waubkuniikwe n’dzhinikaaz, Migizi n’doodem I am an activator/learner/sharer of Anishinaabe ways of knowing and doing, bringing teachings and culture into my wholistic healing practice through ceremony, songs, and land-based activities.

Tara Farahani is a multi- disciplinary artist, woven by her identity and experience as a Queer Iranian woman. With her work, she seeks to provoke thought and inspire emotion. She wants to be the words that give you goosebumps.

Yahya El-Lahib & Ishag Ahmed “ Jumping Beats” A conversation through drumming pulses that brings together diverse Arab and African rhythmic beats.

Axel Blows is a fierce- as- fuck, genderqueer fluid femme top with a penchant for six- inch heels and a passion for acrobatic pole dancing – back the fuck up.

Taien Ng-Chan is a writer and media artist whose work investigates everyday urban life through hybrid forms of experimental and locative cinema, cartography, poetry, and documentary. She is also a founding member of the artist-research collective Hamilton Perambulatory Unit.

Patricia Wilson and Drew Rowsome have been kicking around playing in Crackpuppy for longer than most people can remember. Still they love it so and love those that love it. Both Drew and Patricia are writers and practice that ritual daily. They are glad to be here but really as Keith Richards says they “are glad to be anywhere.”

Emcee Karen Arthurton

Installations:

 

Its not Pretty, Its Wild and Beautiful.

Anna Camilleri, Arun Bryson, Heather Bain, J Toto, Jinx, Jumbo, Karen Arthurton, L Toto, Leanne Powers, May Brand, Mée Rose, Nataleah Hunter Young, Pete Commanda, Rosa Mindreau, Sandy Watters, Sonya Reynolds, Stephanie Latty

The textile is a recreation of an iconic poster that Arturo made for the Ramones’ live shows, which later hung in his loft.  Artists were invited to read Ken Moffatt and Heather Bain’s interview transcripts and celebrate, critique and/or respond to Arturo’s musings, which included themes of art, drugs, immigration, following your intuition, a love of music and male musicians, reflections on celebrity, the history of the Ramones, and his pivotal role within the band. This textile is the collective work of 17 artists.

Decolonizing the image: A hybrid visual discourse of space, place and belonging

Samantha Wehbi.

Reflecting on themes of diasporic existence and displacement, this installation invites participants to enter the world of the artist through the medium of a writing desk where participants are invited to share their thoughts anonymously on themes related to hybrid identities and belonging. These thoughts are recorded on postcards illustrated with original photographs that hold in the same frame literally and metaphorically urbanscapes constructed from original images taken in Lebanon and Canada. This hybrid form of representation seeks to decolonize the image through challenging the separateness of global contexts, and demonstrating power continuities.  In doing so, the installation reclaims a form, the postcard, that has historically been used to reproduce colonial/neocolonial conceptions of place and belonging. Completed postcards are displayed on the desk for other participants to read/respond to as a way to encourage ongoing conversation.

Andil Gosine

Cane Portraiture is a travelling performance series that invites participants to sit for portraits in front of sugarcane.  Its first iteration was conceived for the first annual Indo-Caribbean Alliance Gala at the Jamaica Performing Arts Centre, in Queens, New York.  On May 30th — publicly celebrated as “Indian Arrival Day” in Trinidad and Tobago — the artist shares larger scale images from that first performance (originally held in 2012).

 

DJ Tom Cable has been making playlists since the golden age of recording radio songs on cassette tapes. As his muse Madonna once said, “music makes the people come together.”

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